1. Hope in God

lynnPsalm 16

Psalm 16:9

Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth: my flesh also shall rest in hope.

In June 1953 Lynn placed her hope in God. At that time the Holy Spirit spoke to her, “Repent, repent. Lynn, you are a sinner. Christ died for your sins. He rose again that you might live.” She knelt by my bed and Jesus Christ came into her heart and life. He gives her hope, peace and joy.

He gave Lynn His righteousness. In myself Lynn was unworthy of the least of His mercies. Any goodness in her is what the Lord placed in Lynn. He gave her the gift of salvation. This took away her sin and gave her His righteousness. This gives Lynn hope.

 

This does not mean He took away her sin nature. However, He gave her a new nature. This causes an inward conflict. Which one wins? It’s like Lynn has two dogs. The one wins to whom she says “sickem”. Lynn wants the new nature to win, but Satan tempts her and sometimes the old nature wins that battle. When she confesses that sin, God forgives her, and makes her clean inside. This fills Lynn with hope.

The Lord is her portion. In other words He made Lynn His heir. She does not know nor understand of what all this inheritance consists, but He promises it is “incorruptible, and undefiled, and that fadeth not away, reserved in heaven for you” (1 Peter 1:4). When she passes from this present life, she will receive it. Oh, what hope, and what joy!

The Lord gives her counsel. With it He gives Lynn a choice. She can choose to follow His counsel from His Word, or ignore it. He blesses her when she is teachable and obeys His will. This gives her hope.

The Lord always goes before Lynn. He promised, “I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee” (Heb. 13:5). When she has troubles, He knows all about them. He faced problems, as she does, when He walked upon this earth. Because He has been there, He understands all Lynn’s ups and downs. She is so glad He’s there and helps her go through trials. Hope comes into her soul when she knows He is with her.

At times in my life, my emotions went out of control. I wept and could not restrain myself from weeping. I lost a loved one and could not weep. Since that time, God has helped me greatly. Now my heart is fixed. It is like when I alter a garment. Now it fits me. When my heart is fixed, I am not torn up emotionally. God has given me stability. When this happens in my life, it gives me great hope.

David wrote this psalm. It looked forward to Christ’s coming in the flesh. They laid His body in the grave, but it did not see corruption (Psalm 16:11; Acts 2:25-28). After His resurrection, His heart filled with joy. Many shall turn to Him as Saviour and Lord before He returns in glory. This was the “joy set before Him” (Heb. 12:2).

In conclusion God showed Lynn the path of life. In His presence there is fullness of joy. In Heaven pleasures await her forevermore. This is her sure hope. All who come to Him in faith become His children. He gives them hope. He wants you to enjoy this hope.

Lynn and Leon, her beloved husband, served as missionaries to the Navajo Indian for several years. After God took her honey to Heaven, He called her to write for Him. Many of her articles found publication, and two Sunday School curriculum packages. Ambassador International published her first book, Our Lifeship: A Study in Proverbs for Women. She tells more about her hope at www.writingfrommyheart.com.

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10. Calm in Our Calling

Not Called to the Navajo?

“Lord, please show me what to do,” I sighed. “I’m trying to serve You here, but it’s not cutting it.”

For over three years I went through the motions of Christian service, but my heart did not palpitate with joy. Then I concluded, God is through with me.  I’ll just have to do the best I can.

Then Ron, a missionary to the Navajo, came to our church. He perceived that my heart was not really in my Christian service. He asked me, “What about the Navajo?”

I replied, “I’m not called to the Navajo.” I reasoned, The Navajo language is too hard.  I can speak a little Spanish.  I think God can use me with the Spanish people.

However, nothing opened up with the Spanish-speaking or any other door. One door opened—I did not want to go to the Navajo.

Ron returned one year later. Again he preached for one week in our church.  “Come visit us,” he invited me. “Plan to stay a week or two.”

Wow! I thought. I don’t get many vacations.  I’ll take this opportunity to get away. I said, “Okay, I’ll go for a week.” That one week changed my life.

One day we bounced sixty-five miles in a Volkswagen Bug. Finally, we arrived at Whitewater, a remote area on the backside of the Navajo reservation.

We walked into a small building. Don started a fire in the wood stove. Berta took an empty coffee can, filled it with water and coffee, and set it on the stove. We ate our lunch and washed it down with sweet ice tea and coffee. In the corner of the room sat an old dusty piano.

Before the service we went visiting.  A young Navajo woman said, “Yá’áát’éáh” (a Navajo greeting) as I approached her.

Yá’áát’éáh,” I replied. I just spoke a word in that impossible language, I thought.

Then we returned to the meeting house where a small crowd had gathered. As I played the rusty upright piano, The people sang in Navajo. Something in my heart kept rhythm with the strange words.

Later, I asked Don, “Bro. Don does yá’áát’éáh mean hello?”

He replied, “You’re a pretty good Navajo. God answered my argument, “I can never learn that language,” with one word.

However, I still protested, “I’m not called to the Navajo.”

My last evening in Navajoland I spent in the guest room with my Bible. I turned to Isaiah 42:6, 7: “I the Lord have called thee in righteousness…To open the blind eyes, to bring out the prisoners from the prison, and them that sit in darkness out of the prison house.”

God spoke to me. “Who is as blind as the Navajo? Do they not sit imprisoned by a hopeless religion and in spiritual darkness? Lynn, I want you to go to the Navajo.” I knew God had called me, a single woman, to the Navajo.

When we obey, God blesses. He gave me a husband, Leon, a missionary to the Navajo. He does not call all of us to be missionaries, but He does call each of us to do His will.

9. Calm in Trials

9. Calm in God’s Pavilion 

“For months Ellen’s body wracked with pain,” her husband, said. She lay helpless from two compressed disks in her back. He winced as he helped her with simple needs like personal hygiene and eating.

Ellen had said, “My hobby is helping others.” For months she lay unable to help even herself. Riveting pain often interrupted her sleep. In those long pain-filled hours she turned her thoughts to the Lord.

After many months flat on her back, Ellen rejoiced to be able to attend church again. “I’m thankful,” she testified. “When I can’t sleep at night, it gives me more time to pray.”

After she became a widow, she moved to a nursing home, debilitated and in a wheel chair. “How are you?” she asked residents, wheeling toward them. “Jesus is with you.”

How did Ellen think of others when she faced such great needs of her own? She testified, “I have known the Lord about forty years, and I still have much to learn. I place my full dependence upon Him.”

Ellen displayed contentment. Her heart seemed to be somewhere other than the nursing home. Perhaps she found a secret hiding place—a place of renewal.

Psalm 27:5 promises, “For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his pavilion” (KJV). The essence of prayer is entering into God’s pavilion. Ellen entered and knew how to remain there, especially during adversity. Now she resides in Heaven.

Do we complain when swallowed up by pain? When troubles come do we still have a thankful heart? Do we pray in the face of unwanted circumstances that threaten to consume us? Prayer is responding to God’s invitation to enter into His pavilion, where He hides us under His safe covering. Like Ellen, we can depend on Him and live with a heart full of joy.

Dear Lord, help me to remain thankful when I suffer pain. Equip me to endure troubles. Give me, like Ellen, the habit of helping others. In times of trouble, hide me in Thy pavilion. Thank you, Father, for the safe, tranquil place of prayer where Thou embracest and careth for me. In Jesus’ name. Amen.

This is a reprint article by Lynn Wallace, © 1960. It went online in November 1960 on Prayer Support for Women. This does not appear to still be online.

Bio: Ambassador-Emerald International published Lynn’s book, Our Lifeship: Studies in Proverbs for Women. Periodicals published about eighty of her articles and fillers. Accent Publications published two of her curriculum packages. Leon, her late husband, and she served on the Navajo field several years.She plays the piano for Canyon View Baptist Church in Montrose, Colorado. She enjoys jeeping, reading, and artwork. writeheart@montrose.net. www.writingfrommyheart.com (Our Lifeship available from PayPal.)

6. Keep Calm by Pleasing God

6. Please God

Ellen and Chuck met some people with handicaps. They thought, “We can help these people.” 

They went to their pastor. “We know some special people,” they said. “Some limp and use a cane or walker. Others roll themselves in wheelchairs. Harold can’t talk plain. Several have hearing problems. We’d like to help these people. Can we start a class for them.” 

“Yes,” the pastor agreed. 

Every Sunday I saw these “special people” limp or roll in on wheelchairs. Jesus Christ stepped in and redeemed some of these special souls. 

When Ellen went forward to pray with one of these women, it blessed my heart. 

Sometimes, one got noisy. In her quiet way Ellen took that one of of the service. I marvelled at her patience. 

“What have you learned from these special people?” I asked. “We learned that you don’t stop because you have a problem. Keep going on.” 

My only daughter was born normal. However, I found it difficult to raise her without a daddy when he went to be with Christ. Ellen taught me not to give up, but to keep pressing onward. 

A compressed disk in her back forced Ellen to retire. She did not complain. She depended on Chuck to get her up and down. When able to attend church again, she testified, “When I can’t sleep at night, I’m thankful. It gives me more time to pray.” 

When Chuck’s heart failed him, leaving Ellen a widow, she moved to Valley Manor, a nursing home. She continued reaching out to others in this place. I only heard her complain once because she could not speak to others. 

Ellen would readily admit she has her faults, but to me she set forth an example of a woman who pleased God. He says that it pleases Him when we obey His command to love one another” (1 John 3:22-23). My friend certainly loved others. 

Now she has met her Lord. This godly sailor resides in Heaven where her beloved husband dwells. 

God does not call all of us to reach out to the handicapped as Ellen did, but we can all show our love to others. When we put others before ourselves, it helps bring calm to our hearts. 

Bio: This article is based on a section in Lynn’s book, Our Lifeship: A Study in Proverbs for Women. You can see more about it at www.writingfrommyheart.com. Thank you for your interest.

3. Calm Tongues

3. Little Member—Big Trouble

This little member, the tongue, can get you into a bunch of trouble, or minister grace unto others.

Our pastor became discouraged when a faithful member left with his wife and five children to pastor a church. Lynn said, “God sent Brother Troy out of our church to pastor.” These few words encouraged our pastor. At times the Lord gives words to help someone.

However, hurtful words can flow out of the same mouth. God said, “Out of the same mouth proceedeth blessing and cursing. My brethren, these things ought not so to be,” (Jas. 3:10). My tongue can be used for good or evil.
Once Lynn forgot her husband’s uniforms. “Your uniforms,” She yelled. “I left them at the laundry.” We went back to the laundry and did not find them. Her feet stomped out of the laundry as she bellowed out all the way home. Angry words affected her husband and daughter, not Lynn alone.
If after that explosion, she said, “It’s not that bad,” the poison of these stinging words remained in the atmosphere.
She felt like she was no good. This did not fix the problem.
Saying, “I’m not mad,” solves nothing.
The only remedy when things like this occur is agreeing with God that you sinned with your lips and thoughts.
When you utter venomous words out of your mouth, God will forgive and cleanse you when you admit your wrongdoing. Mankind has tamed all kinds of animals, but not the tongue. God says, “But the tongue can no man tame; it is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison” (Jas. 3:8). Lynn could not tame her tongue, but God did when she made things right.

Bio.: Lynn’s book, Our Lifeship: A Study in Proverbs for Women, contains a chapter on the tongue. You can find more on her website, http://www.writingfrommyheart.com. The columns on the right make her site easier to navigate.

3. Our Eternal Hope

3. My Hope in God’s Mercy

Psalm 33:18, 22

Behold, the eye of the Lord is upon them that fear him, upon them that hope in his mercy. Let thy mercy, O Lord, be upon us, according as we hope in thee.

His eye is on the sparrow, and His eye is on me. God even cares about a little sparrow who falls. He knows how many hairs are upon my head. When I fear Him and hope in His mercy, His eye is upon me.

God’s gives us mercy when we do not deserve it. A prisoner is guilty, but he pleads for mercy. If the judge gives him a lighter sentence or forgives him, that is mercy. God’s mercy reaches farther than this.

In Titus 3:5 God says, “Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost.” Oh, how great His mercy that saved me from the depths of Hell, washed me from all my sins, and gave me the hope of a home in Heaven!

At an early age, I started attending Sunday School and church. regularly. As a little girl, deep questions came into my mind. “Who is Jesus?” “Is He God or is He man?” The Bible stories described Him as a man. However, they tacked on “in Jesus’ name” at the end of their prayers. These questions went unanswered for many years.

When in the seventh or eighth grade in school, someone asked me, “Will you go to Bible School with me?” I went, and heard for the first time how to attain peace with God. Yes, I thought, the gospel must be true. It comes from the Bible. Several years passed before I received peace with God.

The gospel is the good news that Jesus Christ came and died for our sins, and rose again that we might have life. After I believed these truths, I called myself a Christian. This is “head belief.” To become His child, requires faith, we trust in Him from our hearts.

Faith is a gift. God says, “By grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: Not of works, lest any man should boast” (Eph. 2:8-9). Grace is the undeserved favor of God. He gives His children blessings. We do not deserve the least of them. What a wonderful God we serve!

During my third year of school at Whittier College in California, many troubles beset me. I hoped to become a foreign language interpreter. I majored in French, but Whittier did not offer enough courses for a French major. Therefore I enrolled in Spanish literature—Cervantes fifteenth Spanish. I could not understand spoken Spanish. My health started to break. My boy friend’s letters got serious, “Will you marry me?”

With all these problems, I cried out to the Lord. He spoke to my heart, “Repent, repent. Lynn, you are a sinner. Christ died for your sins. Christ arose that you might live. Repent. I knelt by my bed, and Jesus Christ came into my heart and life. Now peace like a river flooded my heart.

Later, God called me to the Navajo. While serving the Navajo Indian, I met my future husband, Leon. God gave us a daughter. After sixteen years of wonderful married life, God took my beloved home.

What will I do now, Lord, I thought. This will take months and months before I know. The next week in church the pastor preached on writing. He described my shanty though he had never seen it. I knew the Lord was speaking to me.

Since that time I’ve been writing. Numerous articles and two curriculum packages found publication. Ambassador International published my first book, Our Lifeship: A Study in Proverbs for Women. God is so good to me!

Lynn’s website tells more about herself and her book. The URL is www.writingfrommyheart.com.

Who Am I?

In the seventh or eighth grade I heard the gospel for the first time. It came from the Bible so it must be true. I thought and believed I was a Christian.

About eight years later the Holy Spirit spoke to my heart. “Lynn, you are a sinner. Lynn, Christ died for your sins and rose again. Repent.” I knelt beside my bed, and Jesus came into my heart. Peace came in like a river.

After graduating from Bible school, I served the Lord mostly in teaching children. When problems came up, my stress turned into distress, and I traveled home.

One pastor counseled me, “Lynn, you carry around too many burdens.” I lacked understanding and called my anxieties “nerves.”

After five years at home, the Lord called me to the Navajo. While there, I met Leon Wallace, and we married. We served as missionaries to the Navajo Indian for several years. However, when we returned home, we discovered that our home church had changed its doctrinal position. We changed churches. After we paid off our debts, we planned to return to the Navajo Indian.

However, the Lord had different plans. He took my beloved home. What am I going to do now? I pondered.

The next week I attended my brother-in-law’s church. Brother Bill spoke on writing. He described my shanty though He had not seen it. I knew the Lord was speaking to me.

From that time I started writing. I love it. God has given me peace and joy. Over eighty of my articles and fillers found publication. Accent Bible Curriculum published two curriculum packages. My first book, Our Lifeship: Studies in Proverbs for Women, came out in 2008. My website is http://www.writingfrommyheart.com.